The Beauty of Wood

Variation in grain and color creates the beauty of real hardwood. Quality wood finishes highlight the unusual graining and color patterns. After hardwoods are finished they are affected by exposure to sunlight and the elements. That’s why new cabinets will never be the same color as an aged sample or bathroom display. Some people find natural variety distasteful, but most welcome it as the reason they chose real wood instead of an imitation wood grain or plastic. Light stains show the color variations most clearly—but the color will change. Wood “mellows” as it ages, often darkening significantly as it expands and contracts over the course of a year. Some species of wood
darken more than others. Opaque (or painted) finishes keep their color, but hairline cracks appear at the joints of the cabinet frame, doors and drawer fronts. When the wood contracts, the seams become more visible, gaining a distinctive characteristic of antique painted cabinetry. Despite the hairline cracks, the joint itself remains strong and solid.

Cherry Natural
Cherry Natural wood color

 

Cherry

Cherry is an old favorite that finishes to a glass-like finish with textured accents provided by small knots, irregular black streaks or pits. The Natural finish and Golden stain show off this variation, including natural dark streaks more than four inches long. The white, cream, pink, mahogany and reddish brown colors tend to become richer and deeper with age. Sable, Dark and Medium stains will moderate some of this natural change, but sharp eyes will still see the wood age. Espresso and Burgundy stains completely masks the color change, but the dark surface highlights the texture of Cherry's gum lines and pits, which once carried nutrients throughout the tree. The surface texturing can be more than a quarter of an inch wide and run the entire length of a piece of wood.

Cherry Rustic Natural
Cherry Rustic Natural wood color

 

Cherry Rustic

Cherry Rustic is an old favorite that finishes to a glass-like finish with textured accents provided by knots, irregular black streaks, and pits. Expect the rustic character of larger knots, open knots, gum lines, pitch pockets, pits, surface splits, dark mineral streaks and worm holes to appear unpredictably throughout to emphasize the natural beauty of the wood. When glaze is applied expect these rustic characteristics to become much more obvious. The Natural finish and Golden stain show off this variation, including natural dark streaks more than four inches long. The white, cream, pink, mahogany, and reddish brown colors tend to become richer and deeper with age. Sable and Medium stains will moderate some of this natural change, but sharp eyes will still see the wood age. Espresso and Burgundy stains completely mask the color change, but the dark surface highlights the texture of Cherry Rustic.

Maple Natural
Maple Natural wood color

 

Maple

Maple possesses warm color and a strong closed grain, which may display vine marks and "bird's eye". Occasionally, a wave-like grain called "flame" maple graces a cabinet: it is prized by makers of guitars and violins for its strength. Dark streaks of black and burnt umber complement the creams, tans and rich browns of the long-time favorite. Lighter finishes show off the contrasting colors and grain characteristics, while darker finishes provide a mellow, traditional finish. Paint disguises the color, but certain grain characteristics add texture to the sheen. As with all paints, cracks will appear at joints of the doors, drawers and cabinet frame as the wood expands and contracts throughout the year.

Oak Natural
Oak Natural wood color

 

Oak

Red Oak creates fine American furniture that adds quiet strength to your home. Smooth, luminous rays run throughout the wood and complement the open grain, providing abundantly textured cabinetry in shades of pink, tan, and white, with touches of green, brown and black. Natural finish and Golden stain highlight the red and pink tones in the wood, while darker stains transform Oak into warm shades of brown. Paint disguises the color, but highlights the open grain - especially when the discerning owner chooses a Glaze combination. As with all paints, cracks will appear at joints of the doors, drawers and cabinet frame as the wood expands and contracts throughout the year.